Definition grammatical number and nouns

Singulative number Some languages differentiate between an unmarked form, the collective, which is indifferent in respect to number, and a marked form for single entities, called the singulative in this context.

The collective form is therefore similar in many respects to an English mass noun like "rice", which in fact refers to a collection of items which are logically countable. Distributive plural Distributive plural number, for many instances viewed as independent individuals for example, in Navajo.

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This is the case in English: For example, in Welsh, moch "pigs" is a basic form, whereas a suffix is added to form mochyn "pig". Another one is "singular" one"dual" two and "plural" more than two. See Quadral and Plural for some examples. Of the Indo-European languages, Northern Kurdish or Kurmanji is one of the few known languages with paucal number.

Swedish hus — "house, houses" but huset — "the house", husen — "the houses". The collective form is therefore similar in many respects to an English mass noun like "rice", which in fact refers to a collection of items which are logically countable.

Pronouns in Polynesian languages such as Tahitian exhibit the singular, dual, and plural numbers. However, English has no productive process of forming singulative nouns just phrases such as "a grain of rice". Therefore, English cannot be said to have a singulative number. The third logical possibility, found in only a few languages such as Welsh and Sinhalais an unmarked plural contrasting with marked singular.

Below are some examples of number affixes for nouns where the inflecting morphemes are underlined: Dual grammatical number The distinction between a "singular" number one and a "plural" number more than one found in English is not the only possible classification.

Usually, the singular is the unmarked form of a word, and the plural is obtained by inflecting the singular.

Estonian puu "tree, wood" singular — puud "the trees, woods" nominative plural Finnish: Paucal number has also been documented in some Cushitic languages of Ethiopia, including Baiso, which marks singular, paucal, plural.

Grammatical number

Affixation by adding or removing prefixessuffixesinfixesor circumfixes: No natural language has it, nor is there any proof that any natural language ever did. The third logical possibility, rarely found in languages, is an unmarked plural contrasting with marked singular.

Other languages, most notably the Bantu languagesmark both the singular and the plural, for instance Swahili see example below.

For instance, in Arabic all nouns can have singular, plural, or dual forms. For example, in Welsh, moch "pigs" is a basic form, whereas a suffix is added to form mochyn "pig". Some languages have no marker for the plural in certain cases, e.

Plural In most languages with grammatical number, nouns, and sometimes other parts of speech, have two forms, the singular, for one instance of a concept, and the plural, for more than one instance.

Distributive plural number, for many instances viewed as independent individuals for example, in Navajo. Other languages, most notably the Bantu languagesmark both the singular and the plural, for instance Swahili see example below. Another one is "singular" one"dual" two and "plural" more than two.

Some languages have no marker for the plural in certain cases, e. Note that analytic languagessuch as Chinesedo not have grammatical number. No language has been documented to have trial number in its nouns.

Mortlockese[ edit ] The Mortlockese language of the Mortlock Islands uses a base 10 counting system. Therefore, English cannot be said to have a singulative number.

What Is Number? (with Examples)

It is the collective form which is more basic, and it is used as an adjectival modifier, e. Plural In most languages with grammatical number, nouns, and sometimes other parts of speech, have two forms, the singular, for one instance of a concept, and the plural, for more than one instance.In most languages with grammatical number, nouns, and sometimes other parts of speech, have two forms, the singular, for one instance of a concept, and the plural, for more than one instance.

Definition: Grammatical Number and Nouns

Usually, the singular is the unmarked form of a word, and the plural is obtained by inflecting the singular. In English grammar, number refers to the grammatical contrast between singular (the concept of one) and plural (more than one) forms of nouns, pronouns, determiners, and verbs.

Although most English nouns form the plural by adding -s or -es to their singular forms, there are numerous exceptions. In linguistics, grammatical number is a grammatical category of nouns, pronouns, and adjective and verb agreement that expresses count distinctions (such as.

NOUN GENDER Noun gender refers to the sex distinction in nouns. They may be classified as masculine, feminine, common or neuter. Nouns which denote males belong to the masculine gender. Examples: Father rooster stag lots of understanding lots of food Nouns which denote females belong to the feminine gender.

(with Examples) Number is a grammatical category which relates to nouns, pronouns, adjectives, and verbs. In English, the two number categories are singular and plural. She plays in the local hockey team and wears the number six.

We also use the phrases a number of, numbers of or the number of with a plural verb when we mean ‘many’ or .

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Definition grammatical number and nouns
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